VANTAGE RHINE RIVER CRUISE, PART 7 FALL 2016

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This is a house that Albert Einstein stayed in when he was young.  This was before he became famous, but someone found out he stayed there and capitalized on it.  Note the cardboard cutout of him in the window.

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This is the group we traveled with having a nice lunch.

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My  sweet Debbie loves her Riesling.

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Overview of the restaurant.

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This is the clock I mentioned earlier.  We’ll go inside the tower and see its workings.

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Note the bird on the left by the numerals, the king and his scepter, the figures on the carousel, and the figure on the right.

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This is the “engine” that makes it work.  The big ball on the left is the pendulum swinging back and forth.

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These are the concrete weights that makes the pendulum swing by pulling on the ropes.

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Of course, the weights have to be pulled back up periodically.  This is our guide, who is winding the clock.  She is a volunteer who maintains the clock.  She is a very community conscious person.  Note the lever with the weight in the center of the picture.  Somehow, this keeps the clock running while being wound.  Otherwise, the clock would lose time during the 10 minutes or so that it takes to wind it up.  When the concrete weights are at the top of the tower, the lever weight is removed and the clock continues to run normally.  (No, Debbie is not waiting her turn the wind the clock.  She’s just watching).

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This clock was built about 400 to 500 years ago.  The builders figured that at some point the gears would wear out.  So, each of the teeth is held on with screws so each tooth can be changed out without replacing the whole gear.

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Another couple of views of the mechanicals.

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Remember the bird?  Periodically, the mechanism would activate this bellows, blowing air over the birds wings, making them flap.  You can see the bear and other characters on the carousel from inside the tower.

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Other parts make the characters move around the carousel, make the king raise his scepter, and another character ring his bell.

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This part makes the hands of the clock move.

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These stairs go farther up the tower.  In our next installment, we’ll see what’s up there.

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